Friday, February 26, 2010

THINK BIG: Young Alumnus To Announce Grant Program at TSU’s Windows onto the World

WHO:        
Tennessee State University Office of International Business Programs will host its annual lecture series with special guest alumnus Malick Badjie, vice president in global client group at BlackRock. Badjie will introduce a program to help student launch careers in international business.

WHAT:     
This year’s Windows onto the World features 2003 TSU graduate Malick Badjie of BlackRock, one of the world’s preeminent asset management firms. Badjie, who develops and manages relationships with the firm's institutional clients in the Middle East and Africa region, will discuss his experience in international banking at the lecture.

He will also introduce the Badjie Service Grant Program, an opportunity for TSU students to receive financial assistance in pursuing international business careers.

A light lunch of traditional African cuisine will be served by Gateway2Africa preceding the presentation.

WHEN:     
Thursday, March 4, 2010, 12 noon – 1:30 p.m.

WHERE:  
Tennessee State University, Avon Williams Campus Auditorium

# # #


TSU President Melvin N. Johnson visits White House for Signing of Executive Order

WASHINGTON - Friday, Feb. 26, 2010, 4:40 p.m., EST (3:40 p.m., Nashville local time) - U.S. President Barack Obama will sign an executive order for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the East Room. 

Tennessee State University President Melvin N. Johnson joins a select group of presidents invited to the White House to attend this event.

In the order, Obama will highlight the role historically black colleges have played in America’s educational system. The event is designed to demonstrate the administration’s commitment to assisting historically black colleges accomplish their educational mission.


To watch the event live, access the White House’s live video stream at
http://www.whitehouse.gov/live/

THINK BIG: Dr. Rebecca Dixon


Black History Month at Tennessee State University
   

 THINK BIG: Dr. Rebecca Dixon

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

Distorted media images and stereotypes about Black identity may make it difficult for students to grasp the depth of knowledge about the culture without guidance from a dedicated and learned scholar. Working daily to preserve truth and diversity, Dr. Rebecca Dixon enlightens students on the rich history of Black culture and literature. The assistant professor of English and Women’s studies was recently selected as a Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) 2009-2010 Maxine Smith Fellow for her leadership in the classroom and throughout the TSU campus.

The Maxine Smith Fellows Program is a TBR initiative designed to provide opportunities for minority employees to increase the diversity of ideas and thoughts to ultimately improve the educational environment at TBR institutions. Dixon’s dedication earned her the recommendation of President Melvin N. Johnson and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Dr. Gloria Johnson for selection into the program. “I believe my acceptance in the program is a recognition of my strong work ethic and passion for teaching,” said Dixon.

Planting the seeds of cultural awareness from both a historical and present-day perspective, Dixon focuses on building student knowledge through community involvement, innovative course design and other projects such as a new website based on the African Diaspora. “So many students are not exposed to books and discussions about Black culture. I try to help extend their knowledge of the culture through a diverse selection of authors and through complex and provocative discussions in the classroom,” she explained.

Dixon hopes participating in the program will also allow her the opportunity to work in other enriching academic activities. “I have been well supported at TSU and have been able to develop a number of courses. In many respects, I am really appreciative to have been selected,” she added.

Dixon will attend the first meeting of the Maxine Smith Fellows in the fall semester.  

THINK BIG: Center for Health Research

        Black History Month at Tennessee State University

THINK BIG: Center for Health Research

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

Tennessee State University’s Center for Health Research discovered a concerning trend after students and alumni conducted nearly 400 surveys on the local community. Results from the study revealed that many men that are of high-risk age either do not go or do not ask their doctors about cancer related issues. In response, the center developed a social marketing campaign for the public health priority of targeting men to go to the doctor for any reason, not just for cancer screening.

“Treatments and medications are created all the time, but it doesn’t make a difference if people aren’t aware of them. The important thing for cancer is detecting it early so that there will be a better outcome,” explained Dr. Pamela Hull, Acting Director for the Center for Health Research at TSU.

According to the Tennessee Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan, cancer claims tens of thousands of lives each year in the state alone. Having teamed up with Meharry/Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Partnership and the Tennessee Cancer Control Coalition, the center works to develop community outreach and prevention strategies to reduce cancer disparities among minorities. One of the center’s top priorities is to maintain long-standing and active relationship with the local African American and Hispanic community in addressing its health-related needs.

Established by Dr. Baqar Husaini in 1976, the Center for Health Research at Tennessee State University has played a major part in examining cancer in the state and local communities in hopes of raising awareness. 

THINK BIG: WTST-AM The Blaze


Black History Month at Tennessee State University
 
THINK BIG: WTST-AM The Blaze
*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

New changes are on the horizon for a familiar entity at Tennessee State University. After years of broadcasting from TSU's Learning Resources Center (LRC), the University's campus radio station WTST-AM The Blaze is preparing to move their operations to the Performing Arts Center by summer’s end.
The big shift across campus will unite the Communications department’s television studio and radio station under the same roof, allowing for more convenient in-class exposure for students and faculty members. The move will also support the department’s new, improved media convergence curriculum for its mass communications emphasis, which has been adopted to cross train students across broadcast and news-related disciplines.
Joseph Richie, the station’s operations manager, has helped turn what is a hobby for most students into a realistic environment in the radio business. The student-operated station features about 50 student announcers each semester assigned to weekly air shifts and host live sports programming and other remote campus events.
“Our students have always approached broadcasting with a lot of creativity. It has been my goal to establish the business aspect in their minds and give them the understanding that any decision they make will impact the station as well as their future careers,” Richie said.
 In the past year, commercial radio stations in Atlanta, Philadelphia, Chicago and radio shows in national syndication have hired students from WTST. “It is rare that students are hired in the top five or even top 10 markets in the country. We are having that happen on a very consistent basis with students from WTST,” Richie explained.
WTST’s signal transmits over-the-air on 1600-AM, on Comcast campus cable on Channel 99 to university buildings and by Internet access through www.tsuradio.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

THINK BIG: Judy Gentry


Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: Judy Fenton Gentry

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to the University’s history, and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus community and beyond.

Life is a dance. Just ask Tennessee State University dance instructor Judy Fenton Gentry, who has devoted more than 30 years to teaching students the art of dance in the Department of Human Performance & Sport Sciences.

Best known for choreographing and naming the TSU Aristocrat of Bands’ Sophisticated Ladies, Gentry continues to serve as the trailblazing force behind the entertaining dance ensemble seen dazzling crowds with intricate footwork year after year. In the spirit of Duke Ellington’s Broadway production, “Sophisticated Ladies,” Gentry lends her expertise to keep her ladies’ classic style fresh and hip with a twist of jazz. 

But it’s not all about the moves for Gentry, who studied with dance greats like Chuck Davis and Mable Love. It’s about giving students the techniques that will keep them on their toes in the classroom and in their careers to come: “I hold my dance students to a standard of excellence. They must be able to compete and put their all into everything they do,” said Gentry, whose two daughters also danced with the Sophisticated Ladies while attending TSU.  

An all-star instructor, Gentry is recognized on the TSU College of Education Wall of Fame and is heralded as a Contemporary Black History Makers Award recipient. As a mentor to students and, sometimes, a mother, Gentry is proud to see her influence live through the students she’s taught and touched.

“I have young ladies who have danced with me and years later their daughters come to dance with me too. It feels great to know I have impacted them in some way,” Gentry said.  

THINK BIG: James Tyus


        Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: James Tyus

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

A life of science is sending TSU graduate assistant James Tyus across the globe to exchange knowledge with world-classed Nobel Prize scientists. Tyus was selected to join a U.S. delegation of young researchers for the 60th annual Nobel Laureates Meetings at Lindau, Germany.

Reserved for the scientific élite, the Lindau Meetings bring together talented students and post-graduates from around the world to meet and interact with Nobel laureates from the fields of physiology or medicine, physics and chemistry.

Each year, more than 20,000 young researchers apply to attend meeting. With the assistance of Drs. Chandra Reddy, Samuel Nahashon, Surenda Singh and Lonnie Sharpe, Tyus will be among 65 U.S. students selected and receive sponsorship from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education to attend the 2010 Lindau Meetings.

Tyus conducts research in TSU’s Poultry Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory in the School of Agriculture and Consumer Science on genetic regulation of the mechanisms by using bird species to explore nutrition, genomics, proteomics and cell culturing. He hopes this experience of a lifetime will offer a new, global perspective in his approach to science.

“I expect that the Laureates will recall their days as graduate students and will point to life experiences that have helped them develop a broader view of the consequences of their work. I am also very excited to meet other young scientists from all over the world. I hope to leave the meetings with a new appreciation for the training of my peers and future collaborators,” said Tyus, who also serves as co-executive director for the Association of Pre-Professional Life Scientists, a professional organization for life sciences with a membership of more than 150 students, faculty and staff throughout middle Tennessee. 

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

THINK BIG: Nicole Dunigan



Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: Nicole Dunigan

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

Some people live for the chance to put big dreams into action. If 1995 Tennessee State University graduate Nicole Dunigan had her way, she would give that chance to everyone she met. That’s why Dunigan hosts Coffee Talk Inc., a monthly networking event with the mission to connect people, businesses and industries while fostering economic development in the community. 

Coffee Talk is held on the third Thursday of each month at the Stillwaters Café on Nashville’s historic Jefferson Street from 7 to 9 a.m. Before heading to the office, local professionals quickly gather for a morning of introductions, reconnections, conversations and, of course, coffee: “The motivation to venture out and start an event aimed at bringing the Nashville community together through effective networking came from the great sense of community I gained at TSU,” Dunigan explained.

Coffee Talk was honored with the Jefferson Street United Merchants Partnership Candlelight Award and recognized by the U.S. Small Business Administration with the Tennessee Minority Small Business Champion Award – testaments to Coffee Talk’s success and growing popularity.

Dunigan serves as vice president for Pinnacle Financial Partners where she is charged with establishing profitable finance relationships within Nashville’s dramatically evolving economic climate. Channeling her desire to connect professionals, she strives to help support their business goals and career growth. 

Dunigan credits the TSU community, along with her mentor, associate dean of the College of Business Dr. Millicent Jackson for inspiring her to think big: “The TSU community has an aura of excellence that has encouraged me to reach for that higher bar and contribute back to the community at large,” Dunigan said. 

THINK BIG: Tiffany Bellafant

Black History Month at Tennessee State University

THINK BIG: Tiffany Bellafant

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

While Tennessee State University celebrated its largest incoming freshman class in recent history last fall, there was a person behind the scenes who created the blueprint that welcomed those record numbers with open arms. Tiffany Bellafant, director for the Center of New Student Enrollment, was determined to create a smoother orientation process for the University that ensured new students - many who are first-time, first-generation freshmen - would be fully serviced and well-adjusted at their new campus.  
A fairly new face at TSU, Bellafant launched a freshly re-designed approach to new student orientation by adding streamlining the traditional process to help guide the registration of and assess the needs of incoming students and their families. The new program featured five one-day registration sessions that included keynote speakers and a financial literacy presentation. With the support of Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Michael Freeman, along with the Financial Aid and Admissions offices, the University enrolled more than 1,000 new students during the orientation program and received rave reviews on the improved process.
Bellafant knew the success of the new process was a matter of TSU giving a good first impression: “Word of mouth means a lot. Orientation must be a positive first experience for our new students and parents as they have up until the last hour to make a decision to go somewhere else. We have built a high level of self-efficacy and students are more confident with navigating the new process.”

This summer, Bellafant hopes to add a sixth day to the program to accommodate the increasing number of students who plan to attend TSU. 

THINK BIG: Dr. William U. Latham

Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: Dr. William U. Latham

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

Perhaps when Justice Thurgood Marshall envisioned his legacy as one that prepared a generation of new leaders, he had Tennessee State University’s Dr. William U. Latham in mind. Latham has been selected by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) as a 2010 Community Leadership Award recipient.

As associate director of the University’s honors program, Latham has been busy prepping high-achieving students to take on the world through global leadership. He placed the first of three undergraduate TSU students into careers on Wall Street directly after graduation, raised $130,000 through two fundraising initiatives for the Honors Program, evolved the program’s curriculum into a rigorous four-course model patterned after the academic program at Harvard University’s Business School and designed an annual Student Leadership Conference that helps students learn how to approach their careers from a global perspective.

Latham believes that his greatest deeds are seen through the success of our students. “I think I have impacted the TSU culture by helping students to leave the University with a different view of the world than what they came in with. I help them adopt the belief that there is no box and that they can fulfill dreams that were initially beyond their capacity,” said Latham, who sends students to intern with companies, including Merrill Lynch, Cummins Filtration, Pricewaterhouse Coopers and SmithBarney. “TSU has inspired me to think big through the legacy of leadership established by the faculty and staff. I try to sow seeds into student’s lives that are long-lasting beyond their matriculation,” he added. 

That level of leadership earned Latham recognition by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. TCMF will host an annual awards reception to honor Latham and others on Monday, March 8 in the TSU Ferrell-Westbrook Agriculture Research Extension Facility.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

THINK BIG: TSU Center for Health Research to co-host Aware For All

The Tennessee State University Center for Health Research will co-host 
AWARE for All, an educational program that is free and open to the public for the purpose of providing education to help people make informed decisions about clinical research participation. The event will be Saturday, February 20, 2010, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Scarritt Bennett Center, 1008 19th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee, 37212. 


To register, visit AWAREforAll.org or call 617-725-2750.



Film Screening - "For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots”




WHO:    
Tennessee State University will host a screening of the documentary film, “For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots,” concurrent with the University’s Black History Month celebrations. Filmmaker Frank Martin will introduce the film and conduct a panel discussion.

WHAT:     

Hosted by Halle Berry, narrated by Avery Brooks, and featuring an introduction by Colin Powell and choral arrangements by Andrae Crouch, this powerful film reveals the untold saga of African Americans' courageous service to their country and their sacrifice spanning from the Revolutionary War to the current battle against global terrorism.

More than two hundred years of heroic exploits of African American fighting men and women will be brought to life as the film’s compelling stories are recounted through dramatic, off-camera readings by more than 40 talented entertainers and public figures. 

The screening will consist of a 40-minute cut of the four-hour film. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Department of Media Relations at 615-963-5331.


WHEN:   

Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 4 p.m.


WHERE:   

Tennessee State University Campus Center, Robert N. Murrell Forum, Room 210



THINK BIG: Speakers and Guests at the 4th annual Student Leadership Conference

Click below to read more about the special guests and dynamic speakers at 4th annual TSU Student Leadership Conference hosted by the University Honors Program.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

THINK BIG: Dr. Wei Chen

Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: Dr. Wei Chen

*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to University’s history and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus, community and beyond.

Tennessee State University is now leading in a wave taking the IT world by storm thanks to professor of computer science Dr. Wei Chen. Chen received the 2010 IBM Faculty Award for her research on new technology and solutions for cloud computing. 

Cloud computing has nothing to do with surfing the net from the friendly skies. Rather, it’s the next generation of computing that changes the way users will manage and organize digital information online. A user will no longer have to download and install large files on their computers, mobile devices or gadgets. Instead, users will be able to easily access and update data through a powerful Internet browser.

“It is a great honor to receive the 2010 IBM faculty award which is a very competitive program that fosters collaboration between researchers at IBM and at leading universities worldwide. As a service, cloud computing is going to offer customers easier, better, faster and more secure options. We are glad TSU is part of the evolution,” Chen said about leading the innovative research project that will serve as the symbol of TSU’s new collaboration with IBM.  

IBM and TSU will implement the design by using the computing resources on campus, integrating cloud computing concepts into courses and including students from the College of Engineering, Technology and Computer Science in Chen’s research activities. 

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

THINK BIG: TSU Athletics Presents Senior Night, February 20


THINK BIG: TSU to host annual Student Leadership Conference

University Honors Program enlists young alumni to develop students for global leadership

WHO:       
Tennessee State University Honors Program will host the 4th annual Student Leadership Conference. Recent TSU graduates from Nike, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, Goldman Sachs and JP MorganChase will lead sessions and panel discussions. Special guest entrepreneur and author Deltarro McNeal will be the keynote speaker.

WHAT:    
The University Honors Program is a community of bright and talented students who serve as campus leaders while positively impacting the university and enhancing the mission of TSU.

With the theme, “Your Personal Brand: Fact or Fiction,” the yearly conference provides a series of sessions and panel discussions aimed at delivering a perspective on the impact of having a personal brand on global leadership to students.

McNeal, Saturday’s keynote speaker, is the winner of the 2009 Who's Who of Business in Tampa Bay. As a motivational speaker and television personality, he has been featured on national and worldwide television networks like FOX News, NBC, BET, TBN, Daystar, Oxygen, and The Word Network as well as syndicated radio shows across America.
                                    
Cost for TSU students is $30.00. Cost for faculty, staff, alumni and the general public is $50.00.

For more information about the conference, contact Dr. William U. Latham at 615-963-5803 or

WHEN:     
February 19-20, 2010

WHERE:   
Tennessee State University Main Campus, Floyd-Payne Campus Center

For a complete schedule of events at the Student Leadership Conference, click here

            

Monday, February 15, 2010

TSU Campus Closes Today at 4 p.m.

Due to inclement weather conditions, Tennessee State University will close today, Feb. 15, at 4 p.m.

Please sign on to Facebook, Twitter or the TSU Newsroom blog for up-to-date weather closings or delays.

In addition, the campus can confirm any further inclement weather closings or delays by calling the TSU Police department at 615.963.5171 or visiting the TSU web site.

TSU Web site: www.tnstate.edu
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nashville-TN/TSU-Office-of-Marketing-and-Public-Affairs/93831967611
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tnstatenewsroom

TSU WIll Delay Opening Two Hours Later Due To Inclement Weather

Tennessee State University will open at 10 a. m. today, Feb. 15, due to inclement weather. 

Employees can confirm any further inclement weather closings by calling the TSU Police Department at 615.963.5171. 

Faculty/staff may check online for additional weather closing announcements at the University’s web site, Facebook and Twitter pages. 

TSU Web site: www.tnstate.edu

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nashville-TN/TSU-Office-of-Marketing-and-Public-Affairs/93831967611

Twitter: http://twitter.com/tnstatenewsroom

Thursday, February 11, 2010

THINK BIG: TSU Faculty Member Awarded $25,000 Grant For Music Conductors Institute


Tennessee State University’s Dr. Robert Elliott, head of the Department of Music, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The funds will support the 105 Voices of History (VOH)/Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Conductors Institute for Choral Conductors.

Administered in partnership with Partners Achieving Success CDC Inc., the professional workshop will include a performance by the 105 Voices of History National Choir given at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Elliott's grant is among 11 awards given statewide.

THINK BIG: The Samuel Shannon Distinguished Lecture Series

The Samuel Shannon Distinguished Lecture Series invites you to attend “The Archaeology of African-Made Places in the Eastern Caribbean, 1650-1990,” by  Dr. Lydia Pulsipher of University of Tennessee Knoxville, Wednesday, February 17, 2010, 12:40 p.m., Boswell Chemistry Auditorium.

Dr. Pulsipher is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Geography at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her research has focused on the political ecology and cultural landscapes of African-Caribbean people from the early 17th century. She also has explored gender and issues of national/ethnic identity for the new Central European members of the European Union, especially Slovenia. Dr. Pulsipher is the author of the widely used college textbook, World Regional Geography: Global Patterns, Local Lives. In 2009, she was honored with the Preston E. James Eminent Latin American Career Award by the Conference of Latin American Geographers. Professor Pulsipher is a previous recipient of the National Council on Geographic Education’s Mentor of the Year award. She is a member of the Society of Women Geographers.

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

THINK BIG: Eric Capehart

Black History Month at Tennessee State University


THINK BIG: Eric Capehart
*Tennessee State University celebrates Black History Month by recognizing individuals or organizations that have made noteworthy contributions to the University’s history, and are taking the “Think Big, TSU BIG!” approach to their areas of study and expertise while impacting the campus community and beyond.

It didn’t take much for 2004 Tennessee State University graduate Eric Capehart to recognize that minority youths fall prey to issues like poverty and crime at higher rates than their Caucasian peers. He found that any combinations of those issues lead young men of color to prematurely spend time in the juvenile court system.

Capehart felt a calling—“an inner voice”—that challenged him to do something about it. So, in 2007, the Nashville native founded All The King’s Men. The Christian-based nonprofit organization provides mentor programming for middle and high school-aged minority men living in the Nashville area. “I envisioned my organization to be one that would work to reduce the disproportionate minority contact with the juvenile court system among young men of color across the country. We are working to spread our mission on a global spectrum,” Capehart said.

The organization recruits Tennessee State University male students from the campus organization Collegiate 100 Black Men to become mentors in the program and calls on both local figures and former criminals to serve as speakers. The program spans the life of the young men from childhood into adulthood as the mentee grows into a mentor for future generations. Just last year, WSMV-TV Channel 4 News endorsed All The King’s Men as an effective program that actually works. To learn more about Capehart’s program, visit www.akmnashville.org.